How Hofstra Lacrosse Conditions

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By Chad Zimmerman

If you want to step even one foot on the field this season, you need to prove it right here and right now—by passing your conditioning test. Yep, it's that dreaded day—the day you gain the right of passage to athletic stardom. Unless of course you play lacrosse for Hofstra, because the Pride's strength and conditioning coach Ryan Martin builds his team's conditioning with a seven-week plan that doesn't require a test to prove its effectiveness. "If they follow the program and do what they're supposed to be doing, we know their conditioning will be where it's supposed to be," Martin says.

Hofstra's conditioning program includes three two-week phases followed by a final week that incorporates speed and agility tests. "Mondays are longer runs, and we look at sprints on Thursdays," Martin says. "So on Mondays, we build their anaerobic bases, and on Thursdays, we get them ready to sprint and then recover—get to max speed on a little bit of rest."

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By Chad Zimmerman

If you want to step even one foot on the field this season, you need to prove it right here and right now—by passing your conditioning test. Yep, it's that dreaded day—the day you gain the right of passage to athletic stardom. Unless of course you play lacrosse for Hofstra, because the Pride's strength and conditioning coach Ryan Martin builds his team's conditioning with a seven-week plan that doesn't require a test to prove its effectiveness. "If they follow the program and do what they're supposed to be doing, we know their conditioning will be where it's supposed to be," Martin says.

Hofstra's conditioning program includes three two-week phases followed by a final week that incorporates speed and agility tests. "Mondays are longer runs, and we look at sprints on Thursdays," Martin says. "So on Mondays, we build their anaerobic bases, and on Thursdays, we get them ready to sprint and then recover—get to max speed on a little bit of rest."

Here's an inside look at the details of the second phase of Martin's conditioning program.

The Mondays of the second two-week phase include long shuttle runs, while the two Thursdays involve 40- to 80-yard sprints. Martin explains the format of this second phase: "For the long shuttle, we mark off 60 yards, and they complete 5 trips for a total of 300 yards. We look to get our guys under 55 seconds. We give our goalies a little slack; they get 60 seconds. We start with 4 reps, and the next week we do 6, with about 3 minutes rest after each shuttle. On the first Thursday, we do 4 80-yard sprints under 11 seconds, goalies under 13; then we do 6 60-yard sprints under nine seconds, with the goalies in under 11. The next Thursday, we still do the 80s and 60s, but we add 6 40s. For the 40-yard sprints, we're looking at the guys to be under six seconds and the goalies to be under six and a half."

Martin recommends a 40- to 45-second rest between the 80s, 40 seconds between the 60s and 30 seconds between the 40s. He also points out that the times for the sprints are just bare minimums. If you can go faster, do it. "If a guy is doing the 80-yard sprint in barely 11 seconds, he needs to keep working harder, because our top guys run it in eight or nine seconds."

Phase 2:

Week 1 Exercise Reps Time Rest
Monday 300-yard shuttle 4 55-60s 3min
Thursday 80-yard sprint 4 11-13s 40-45s
  60-yard sprint 6 9-11s 40s
Week 2        
Monday 300-yard shuttle 6 55-60s 3min
Thursday 80-yard sprint 4 11-13s 40-45s
  60-yard sprint 6 9-11s 40s
  40-yard sprint 6 6-6.5s 30s

Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

Topics: ENDURANCE TRAINING | LACROSSE | SPRINT | SHUTTLE